Tuesday, February 21

Two things to help you take a better interiors photo

I am no photography expert! Far from it! But some of you asked, so I thought I'd share, the first two things I learned when I picked up a DSLR.  Yes, this is how I started - by ignoring everything complicated and focusing on two settings that would improve my images!

1-ISO

The less light in the room the higher the ISO needed to get the shot.... why not always use high ISO? Because with a higher ISO, your picture will look more grainy. An example, low ISO (left) and higher ISO - but not TOO high (right) (all else held constant):





2-Exposure compensation

The higher the exposure compensation the brighter the whites...why not always use the highest exposure? Because your white objects will lose detail. Plus too much exposure and your colours look faded. Some examples - changing only the exposure compensation:







That's it!!! 


I was lucky enough to have someone show me how to adjust these settings on our camera (Thanks dear!)! Your challenge is to dig the info out of a manual.

So remember, if you are taking a picture indoors on a cloudy day - don't turn on the lights!!! Increase your ISO and exposure in your camera to make it look sunny and let those whites really pop!


Get that camera off manual auto, EXPERIMENT!, and let me know if it makes a difference!!!

 



Note:
- It is best to work with daylight! I try not to take photos in the evening.  You don't need a super sunny day! 
- I am just starting to learn photoshop...so in the past, I didn't know how to use any software to 'save' my photos...I had to learn how to adjust the settings on the camera, so I could post them without edits. 

- I really hope this helps!  I am sorry if it seems misleading or incomplete...it is all I knew when I started out, the way I understood it, and it made a huge difference in the quality of my pictures! I want to share my experience, my point of view...


 

24 comments:

  1. In your last comment do you mean to get your camera off automatic?
    I love to see the comparables. I don't adjust ISO because my camera isn't that great with a higher ISO and goes really grainy. Too sunny can be a challenge - overcast is better. If you look at my bathroom photos in the house tour it was too sunny for the photos, but I had to take them that day or wait another week for a hopefully better day. The shadows from sun are harsh.
    I don't use photoshop, no idea how to use it - I do minor editing in Aperture where I save my photos. I think I'll try to learn it this year.

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  2. This is great Shannon! You take such amazing photos (and your house is as gorgeous as ever). I don't even know where my exposure compensation is... must look that up!

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  3. Excellent suggestions! I am a novice and have been struggling to get the ISO and EC right. My ISO is at 3200, EC at +0.7, WB at Auto, yet often my pictures still didn't turn out so "sunny" as yours. Perhaps I need to get a better camera.

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  4. my EC is often close to 2!!

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  5. oh yah! auto! duh!

    i know how to do 3-4 things in photoshop now! i feel like a champ!!!!!!

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  6. Hi,
    could you please tell me where you got your sofa from? Or, what make is it? Thanks!

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  7. Hi Denise,
    It's from elte
    Mitchell gold + bob williams

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  8. thanks.. i'm going to try this! my husband got me a photography book for valentine's day...now i just have to find the time to read it!

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  9. I love these tips. When I (recently) started using my sisters dslr, I was looking for specific tips like these... it's great to have a starting point.

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  10. I took photography way back in grade 10 so I don't remember a thing, but I always appreciate when people post tips and tricks every now and then, because it's easier to remember! Going through whole tutorial sites is overwhelming!
    My camera (not a normal DSLR) has auto and manual and I keep meaning to play around with the manual functions, but it's just so easy to default to auto.

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  11. Under this Danforth roofFebruary 21, 2012 at 6:46 PM

    This is super helpful. My house has little natural light, and my photos are super grainy and yellowish, so I am going to experiment with your tips tonight.

    One of my mat leave goals is to take a course, so maybe I'll do some research on that tonight too...I'm inspired! Thanks!

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  12. the yellow is your white balance...are you using natural light? shut those light switches off!

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  13. I have just a 35mm point and shoot type camera that I keep on auto....i don't even know how to adjust the ISO or even if I have one!

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  14. Heather @ InteriorGroupieFebruary 21, 2012 at 9:53 PM

    So helpful Shannon! I don't have a DSLR but just a point and shoot and I guess you could say a new years' resolution of mine is to learn how to use it better on manual settings...and use a tripod :) I think that it's made a huge difference in my photos - funny how much a flash can really screw up a picture. Keep the photo tips coming!

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  15. so I just looked at my little point and shoot that I'm playing around with and, miracle of all miracles, ISO is an option (that I never noticed...). Next time can you include what level you used? I know it won't be easy to replicate based on light but I guess I am looking for the difference between "low" and "higher". Thanks!

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  16. what a great post...i totally need to play around more with my camera. Keep these posts coming!

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  17. I didn't put numbers because i don't want to give any sort of 'rules'...

    Our DSLR ISO goes up above 6400. I can literally take a photo in an almost dark room - but it's grainy/pixelated looking!

    I normally shoot indoors at 800 or 1600.

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  18. The higher did wonders! I just mentioned you on my new post. Btw, love the new layout, header, and the circular-cropped images on the side.

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  19. You definitely always have completely gorgeous pictures here...I need all the help I can get! The most I've done is get Instagram on my phone...it's pathetic, I know...(c: Great suggestions!

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  20. Shannon this is so useful! I always love hints on better photography and photoshopping, so thanks for sharing.

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  21. Interesting, I've been taught to always have exposure compensation set to 0. But those are amazing improvements when you bump it up. Love bright whites!

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  22. Ok so obviously I am getting caught up on my blog reading. Duh - that's what can happen when I am not working! Ok so I am going to sit down with this blog post - and my camera. If I still can't figure it out.... Well I don't know then! Thanks!
    Meagan

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  23. You're a gem!!!! Trying this out -- which may mean you get to see more photos of my home soon! Yippee! ox

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